steveliss has picked a winning logo design

For $0 they received 140 design concepts from 47 designers!

Over 40,000 small businesses - and some big ones - trust crowdSPRING with custom logo design, web design and writing services. 96% of them would recommend that you try us too.

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Dates

Starts:17-Aug-09 11:28 p.m. GMT

Ends:28-Aug-09 11:28 p.m. GMT

Awards

Award 1: $0, was awarded to alicera...

Formats

"EPS","PSD","AI (VECTOR BASED)","JPG"

Contract

Preview: crowdSPRING Contract

Materials

There are no materials for this project.

Give Back
Give Back is our community's way of helping worthy non-profit and charity causes. Creatives have agreed that for these special projects, no monetary awards will be given. crowdSPRING will waive its fees and will assist the organizations with posting their project. We will collaborate together to help those less fortunate. Give Back projects will work just like standard projects, including contracts, wrap-up, notifications, etc. To help the learning process along in these projects, we will encourage creatives to collaborate and to provide constructive feedback to each other.
We will find ways to recognize creatives whose work is selected. Among other things, we will write in our blog about the project and the winning creative, the work will appear on a Hall of Fame type page that we are developing (this page will display winning designs), and we will look for ways to profile the winning creative(s) on our home page.
We'll ask the winning creatives in Give Back projects to propose other worthy non-profits and charities that can benefit from this effort. We hope that in this small way, we can help non-profits and charities around the world.

Creative brief

The buyer added updates to the brief. Read them.

It’s been 40 years since the idealism of Robert F. Kennedy and the Johnson administration’s “War on Poverty” placed economic injustice at the heart of American political and social discourse. Since then poverty has fallen off the national agenda, and for decades the poor in America have been mostly invisible.

Today, the issue of poverty is again poised to emerge at the center of our national conversation. We have an idealistic new president who has known poverty and who has committed to working on the critical issues that are expanding poverty’s ranks. And, in stark contrast to the indifference of mainstream media, there is a renewed spirit of civic engagement, particularly among young people, in the United States today. Within this framework we find ourselves at a moment in American history when addressing poverty, particularly as it affects children, can once again be incorporated into mainstream priorities. After decades of inattention and even backlash directed at those of lesser means, our collective conscience is finally ripe for change.

In Our Own Backyard is an organization of photojournalists committed to the cause of social justice in the United States. Our inaugural project is a multimedia examination of the daily struggles of impoverished Americans: a comprehensive and innovative campaign that will affect the way the general public and policymakers think about poverty in America.

We believe that increasing awareness about poverty is a critical prelude to building support for initiatives that can create lasting impact in the lives of disadvantaged people. Visual story-telling is unique in its power to achieve that awareness, and it can foster empathy for those living in poverty in a way that text and statistics alone cannot.

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT US:

We're a non-profit 501(c)3 organization composed of photojournalists who are among the most recognized in our profession. Many have devoted their entire professional lives to documenting the lives of poor people and those who suffer injustice. A few are younger and more committed to the newer 'personal vision' esthetic, but most of us are classically trained and very content oriented. All of us want to use our skill to renew public awareness about domestic poverty. We believe that change doesn't happen in a vacuum and that the failure of poverty to gain traction with the public is partially a result of the lack of visibility for the issue, partly a result of inaccurate or incomplete stereotypes about who poor people really are and the obstacles they face, and partly a result of a defeatist belief that poverty is insoluble. We intend to use the transformative power of visual journalism -- still photography, multi-media and video -- to address those misconceptions.

HERE IS WHAT WE NEED:

A great logo, simple yet dynamic, contemporary yet classic. Simple, right? LOL
Unless we want to change the color scheme on our website: http://inourownbackyard.us/ we should probably have a logo that works well with that color scheme.

OUR TARGET AUDIENCE IS:

We want this campaign to resonate across the broadest spectrum of people possible. I know that's not particularly helpful, and, if you held a gun to my head I'd have to say our hope for change lies primarily with younger people: middle school, high-school and college students. They are the children of Obama, just as we were the children of Kennedy. Thirty years of Reaganism has left people my age disheartened and people 25-45 disengaged. (I would say disillusioned but that's not possible, because for the most part they never had any illusions.) We want people to dream again of a more just society...with criteria for success greater than "Are you better off than you were four years ago?'

WE LIKE THESE DESIGNS:

Not sure where to find these. I'm not sure this would help anyhow. but please let me know where to find these and I'll give it a try if you want.

WE ABSOLUTELY MUST HAVE (or we don't want to see) THIS IN OUR DESIGN:

Nothing that I can think of.

Brief updates

21-Aug-09 2:17 a.m. GMT
THERE ARE SOME PROMISING LOGOS TO DATE AND I DEEPLY APPRECIATE THE THOUGHT AND EFFORT. IN LOOKING AT THEM A FEW THINGS OCCUR TO ME THAT MAY BE HELPFUL:

1. IF WE ACCEPT THAT GREAT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS ARE BORN OF HOPE, NOT DESPAIR THEN IN OUR OWN BACKYARD IS GOING TO NEED TO TURN OUR ATTENTION TOWARDS DOCUMENTING SUCCESS STORIES ABOUT PEOPLE AND PROGRAMS AS WELL AS DOCUMENTING THE NEEDS OF THOSE WHO SUFFER. SO IT MIGHT NOT BE A BAD IDEA TO CONSIDER LOGO DESIGNS THAT REFLECT THAT HOPEFUL SPIRIT. IF, FOR INSTANCE, A TREE IS PART OF THE DESIGN, PERHAPS IT SHOULD SUGGEST GROWTH AND POSSIBILITY, RATHER THAN GLOOM. THIS IS JUST A THOUGHT.

2. SPEAKING OF TREES, (THOUGH THE CONCEPT OF A TREE DOES MAKE SENSE) I THINK THE LOGOS OVERALL MAY BE A BIT TOO LITERAL. I'D LOVE TO SEE SOME SIMPLE, PERHAPS ABSTRACT, LOGOS AS WELL.

3. IN NONE OF MY INSTRUCTIONS DID I INCLUDE THE FACT THAT THIS IS A DOCUMENTARY EFFORT AND THAT PERHAPS THE LOGO MIGHT REFLECT THAT COMPONENT OF IT. THE REASON FOR THIS WAS TO AVOID TOO MANY LOGOS WITH CAMERAS AND FILM STRIPS AND SHUTTER LEAFS AND THE USUAL CLICHES. STILL, IT MIGHT BE WORTH TRYING TO INCORPORATE THE IDEA OF PHOTOGRAPHY OR DOCUMENTARY WORK IN A LOGO. I DON'T THINK THIS IS EASY OR A PRIORITY...I JUST THROW IT OUT FOR CONSIDERATION.

FORGIVE THE CAPS...I WANTED FOLKS TO KNOW THAT THERE WAS NEW INFORMATION HERE.

AGAIN, I'M DEEPLY GRATEFUL FOR YOUR WONDERFUL AND VERY GENEROUS EFFORTS ON OUR BEHALF!

STEVE LISS
DIRECTOR -- IN OUR OWN BACKYARD