How do I score the entries in my project?

The crowdSPRING scoring system is based on a familiar 5-star system. It is critical that you try to score every entry you receive as this can make a very big difference in both the quality and quantity of submissions you receive.

Be careful not to throw around scoring like candy. Typically there will be very few "4-star″ ratings and even fewer "5-star″ ratings (generally, the eventual winner is scored as a '5'). That said, make sure that it's a home-run before you give out high scores, especially early in a project. Make the Creatives work HARD for your appreciation and that golden number. Giving high scores early in a project – unless truly merited – will turn Creatives away from your project.

Here is one way you can evaluate entries based on a 5-star scoring scale:

1-Star: Thanks, but I don't like this concept. Please try a different one

2-Star: Needs some major work; try improving it.

3-Star: Seems to be on the right track, but could use improvements.

4-Star: Almost there - this could be a winner and is definitely in the running.

5-Star: Absolutely great! I love it!

When scoring, be sure to score all entries. Remember that Creatives learn a great deal about what you're looking for from your scoring. If you don't score entries, you're sending a message to the Creatives that you don't value your project or their time. Typically, Creatives won't participate in projects where Buyers are not actively scoring; remember every project has a "Stats" tool which allows creatives to see how you are scoring entries and how many comments you are leaving; we know for a fact that the very best designers on the site will not participate in projects with low "health" statistics.

One more thing; don't assume you must be nice all the time. If you don't like the design, make sure you score it lower. Don't waste the Creative's time by giving them false hope. Regardless, score!

Last updated: 29-Nov-10 8:24 p.m. GMT

Tags: comments, createspace, feedback, iterate, revise, scoring

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